Why Division 1 college athletes should be paid - Essay Prowess

Why Division 1 college athletes should be paid

Why Division 1 college athletes should be paid

Why Division 1 college athletes should be paid

Introduction

Over the past few years, the popularity of college athletics have increased all over the world, and this has made some institutions such as the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) as well as the various colleges to gain revenues especially from the higher levels that are realized as a result of holding this athletics. However, despite the increased revenues that are realized through athletics, the students who participate rarely receive their share. For this reason, the debate of whether to student athletes should be compensated or not has on, whereby some individuals arguing that student athletes should be paid while others maintaining that they should not be compensate. Precisely, some of the lucky athletes tend to receive free scholarship from their respective institutions while most athletes are not appreciated or recognized in any way despite their efforts and skills of making their institutions to shine locally, regionally and globally. This paper pays high attention to the argument that college athletes should be paid.

In the contemporary world, there are numerous sportsmen and sportswomen who have the classes such as the Hollywood celebrities who are well compensated for their talents and creativity. However, no matter how well college athletes demonstrate their skills, they are treated like amateurs by the college and NCAA. Colleges and NCAA should recognize the efforts and skills of college athletes since the two bodies have adequate resources to do so. After analysis the financial gains that colleges and NCAA receive through the efforts and skills of college athletes, most economist reveal that there exists no financial factors that can hinder these two institutions from paying student athletes. According to David Berri, the professor of economics at Southern Utah University, individuals who argue that paying student athletes is an additional labor cost that disrupts college sport programs do that on egocentric grounds (National Collegiate Athlete Association 10-11). Berri argues that sports such as athletics is one of the non-profit programs, and any amount of revenues that are realized through these programs should be shared among all parties, and this includes student athletes.

In addition, Rodney Fort, a sports economist as well as the professor of sports at the University of Michigan maintains that the National Collegiate Athletic Association has adequate resource

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