Virtual simulation for homelessness in Minnesota for Type 1 diabetes patients - Essay Prowess

Virtual simulation for homelessness in Minnesota for Type 1 diabetes patients

Virtual simulation for homelessness in Minnesota for Type 1 diabetes patients

  

Virtual simulation for homelessness in Minnesota for Type 1 diabetes patients

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Virtual simulation for homelessness in Minnesota for Type 1 diabetes patients

The world today is characterized by unprecedented homelessness issues. In the wake of such problems, many have been attacked by occurring illnesses including diabetes. However, nurses conduct a virtual simulation to teach or provide additional training in medical procedures. In this case, training on diabetes and how to care for a homeless person newly diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes is conducted. In this essay prevalence of homelessness in Minnesota is discussed and that of Type 1 diabetes. It further reflects on what homelessness is encountering and of having to do routine care for diabetes like blood glucose monitoring, meals, and meal planning, carbohydrate and insulin ratios, administering insulin, safe needle care, addressing hypo and hyperglycemia, skin care, etc. Finally, it gives a discussion of nursing implications and their responsibilities concerning homelessness for patients with Type 1 diabetes and gives a way of addressing these issues.

As such, the population and data of people experiencing homelessness and those diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes are evaluated. Homelessness is quite alarming among the youth, children, and adults population. At the beginning of 1992, research was conducted after every 3 years to gather data in the homelessness population in Minnesota (Research, 2016). In the recent study of 2015, interviews were done face to face with unaccompanied youth and adults in various shelters and later there were single night counts. It was identified that a total number of people in Minnesota who are experiencing homelessness by the year 2015 were nearly 40,000. Its prevalence is high in this population and it could be higher if it were not of the available wide supportive services, and children who were along with their parents were around 35% in this homeless population (Research, 2016). 

This paper presents health issues that have been a continuing significant concern amongst the homeless with many experiencing chronic health illnesses occurring together. In the description of type 1 diabetes which involves no or little amount of insulin produced by the pancreas is among the chronic illnesses prevalent in Minnesota’s homeless population. Its prevalence is around 9% which is less in young people and more in older adults who need to seek constant medical attention (Research, 2016). Therefore, a newly Type 1 diabetes patient should be treated and cared for in order to avoid other illnesses from occurring as it is the case among this population.

Various scholarly references highlight challenges that come with being homeless in various locations. First, racial disparities are persistent and they occur to all locations, genders, and age groups within the homeless population. In this case, African American adults are discriminated by historic trauma and housing where some are overrepresented in terms of color. Second, the challenge of distribution of gender which varies as men are likely to stay on streets while women in transitional houses. Third, age groups issue whereby oldest men live in emergency shelters and youth in Rapid Rehousing.

Routine care challenge can emanate from instability. People who lack stable residence or completely homeless can have trouble to do routine care for themselves and clinicians will not be able to care for them appropriately. Therefore, getting to care for diabetes controls like blood glucose monitoring, meals, and meal planning, carbohydrate, and insulin ratios, administering insulin, safe needle care, addressing hypo and hyperglycemia, skin care, etc. can be a challenge. This challenge is obliged to the fact that the homeless do not have regular meals with dietary choices as they eat whatever is only available, and most food in their shelters is high in sugar, fat, or starch. Moreover, they have limited access to refrigeration required to store insulin and can also be tempted to sell their syringes given that they cannot be able to afford oral medications’ cost. To add, supplies and glucometers are hard to find especially for patients who are not insured and storing glucometers in shelters is risky because they can be stolen.

Implications of nurses in familiarizing themselves with things associated with medications and conditions then try to resolve them are important. From my professional experience, it is evident that they can have positive impacts on patients. Hence, new technologies and strategies should be evaluated to support safety administration of medication. Their implication of repeatedly addressing technical, human, and organizational issues affecting patient safety should be given much weight, with more emphasis on transforming their work environment so that patients should be kept safe. However, this implication needs more interdisciplinary research and their involvement in addressing improved care for patients, especially to the homeless.

Nurses have responsibilities concerning homelessness for those with Type 1 diabetes. First, they care for them and ensure they are treated to bar other illnesses from developing. Second, they should train them on routine care even if conditions may be tough and advise them to live in better shelters where they can easily be taken care of. Third, they should provide them with clinical care and social services and make a follow up including prescribing treatment and offering professional counseling to them (Cardarelli, Carlson, Jackson, & Ward). Fourth, they take responsibility for ensuring that records for each Type 1 diabetes patients are kept well for easy facilitation in the delivery of medications. The question that remains is a way in which nurses start addressing homelessness issues. In this case, they must understand their beliefs and personal values and how they can differ with that of patients; hence, multidisciplinary management should intervene to prevent patients from getting involved with care fragmentation and multiple providers (Cardarelli, Carlson, Jackson, & Ward).

This dynamic of homelessness and Type 1 diabetes in Minnesota has become prevalent. There are challenges that come with homelessness and having to do routine care for diabetes like blood glucose monitoring, meals and meal planning, carbohydrate and insulin ratios, administering insulin, safe needle care, addressing hypo and hyperglycemia, skin care, etc. Lastly, an explanation of nursing implications and responsibilities concerning homelessness for patients with Type 1 diabetes and ways of addressing the issues has been explored.

References

Cardarelli, C., Carlson, E., Jackson, R., & Ward, K. (n.d.). The Blue Ribbon Task Force on Health Care for the Homeless. Retrieved from http://www.unthsc.edu/research/wp-content/uploads/sites/21/Homeless_Health_Care_document_8_15.pdf

Diabetes Care: Old Challenges, New Strategies. (1999, October). Retrieved from https://www.nhchc.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/Oct-1999-Healing-Hands.pdf

Research, W. (2016, November). Homelessness in Minnesota. Retrieved from http://mnhomeless.org/minnesota-homeless-study/reports-and-fact-sheets/2015/2015-homelessness-in-minnesota-11-16.pdf