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Postpartum Depression Essay

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Postpartum Depression

Ay F., Tektas E., Mak A., and Aktay N., (2018). Postpartum depression and the factors affecting it: 2000-2017 study results. Instabul University, Turkey. DOI: 10.14744/phd.2018.31549 J Psychiatric Nurs 2018;9(3):147-152.

The authors of this article have explored the predominant factors that affects postpartum depression. Among the factors that were identified were not limited to the number of pregnancies, history of depression in the mother or her family, having multiple children, economic condition, and unplanned pregnancies. This article is a scholarly reference since it is based on the findings of other articles that were previously conducted. The article is relevant to my topic since it identifies the risk factors for the occurrence of postpartum depression.

Beck J., (2018). What Managers Should Know About Postpartum Depression? Harvard Business Review.

The author of this article sensitizes managers to consider women employees especially after reporting back to work from maternity leave.  Precisely, the author sensitizes managers to support such employees by offering peer and professional support, providing good coverage, eliminating misunderstandings involving parental leave. This article is scholarly reference since it is a review of previously published article. This article is important to the topic since it helps in encouraging individuals who are immediate to new mothers to understand and treat the latter with great care.

Ruybal A., and Siegel J., (2017). Increasing Social Support for Women with Postpartum Depression: An Application of Attribution Theory. American Psychological Association. Stigma and Health © 2016 American Psychological Association 2017, Vol. 2, No. 2, 137–156.

The authors of this article advocates for social support for women with postpartum depression. In order to achieve this, the authors embraced the use of attribution theory on motivation and affect. The study established that the use of the attribution theory greatly helps in reducing blame and stigmatization of women with postpartum theory, as well as enhancing social support to this group. This article is a scholarly article since it entails research based evidence concerning ways of supporting women with postpartum depression. I will use the findings of this theory to sensitize enrich my topic especially on how to sensitize the society to provide social support to the women with postpartum depression.

Chinwe O., Afolabi A., and Mike I., (2017). Postpartum Depression: The Role of Self-Esteem, Social Support and Age. Ife PsychologIA 25(2) 2017. 105 – 115. Ife Centre for Psychologial Studies/Services, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

This article explores the role of social support, self-esteem and age on postpartum depression. The study established that mothers who have low social support have tends to be at a high risk of developing postpartum depression compared to mothers with high social support. This article is a scholarly article since it is a research and this means that the findings are reliable and precise. I will use the findings of this article to sensitize the society concerning the importance of sensitizing women with postpartum depression.

Serene S., McCord M., Stein R., Kerker B., Weiss D., Hoagwood K., and Horwitz S., (2017). Beyond Screening: A Step Care Pathway for Managing Postpartum Depression in Pediatric Settings. JOURNAL OF WOMEN’S HEALTH Volume 26, Number 9, 2017. Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. DOI: 10.1089/jwh.2016.6089.

This article explores the importance of screening new mothers on whether they are at a risk of developing postpartum depression. Pediatric primary care providers have the role of screening mothers in the maternity wards since they engage or associate with them more frequently compared to adult health care providers. This article is importance since it does not only stipulate the importance of screening mothers on postpartum depression, but also who is supposed to screen them.

Silverman, M. E., Reichenberg, A., Savitz, D. A., Cnattingius, S., Lichtenstein, P., Hultman, C. M., … & Sandin, S. (2017). The risk factors for postpartum depression: A population‐based study. Depression and anxiety, 34(2), 178-187.

This article explores the risk factors for the development of postpartum depression. Among the factors identified are or limited to women with a history of depression and gestational diabetes. This article is applicable to my research since it gives a deeper insight concerning the factors which contributes to the development of postpartum depression.

Poyatos‐León, R., García‐Hermoso, A., Sanabria‐Martínez, G., Álvarez‐Bueno, C., Cavero‐Redondo, I., & Martínez‐Vizcaíno, V. (2017). Effects of exercise‐based interventions on postpartum depression: A meta‐analysis of randomized controlled trials. Birth, 44(3), 200-208.

This article explores the impact of physical activity interventions during pregnancy as a way of minimizing the risk of developing postpartum depression. Physical activity during pregnancy reduces the risk of developing postpartum depression. This article is relevant to my research since it stipulates the most appropriate intervention for postpartum depression.

Gentile, S. (2017). Untreated depression during pregnancy: short-and long-term effects in offspring. A systematic review. Neuroscience, 342, 154-166.

The author of this article has assessed the short term and long term effects of antenatal exposure to untreated maternal depression symptoms. Some of these effects are not limited to decreased dopamine levels, irregular fetal heart rate, hyperactivity, increased rate of premature death, reduced vagal tone among others. The findings of this article will enrich my research by stipulating these short term and long term effects of untreated maternal depression.

Dubber, S., Reck, C., Müller, M., & Gawlik, S. (2015). Postpartum bonding: the role of perinatal depression, anxiety and maternal–fetal bonding during pregnancy. Archives of women’s mental health, 18(2), 187-195.

This article explores the impact of postpartum depression to postpartum bonding. The findings of this study shows that postpartum depression negative affects the mother-child bonding. This article is application to my research since it explains the impact of postpartum depression to mother-infant bonding.

Stewart, D. E., & Vigod, S. N. (2019). Postpartum Depression: Pathophysiology, Treatment, and Emerging Therapeutics. Annual review of medicine, 70, 183-196.

The authors of this article stipulates the disordered physiological processes and treatment options for postpartum depression. The authors advocates for the use of medications, somatic treatments as well as evidence-based psychotherapy. This article is applicable to my research since it does not only stipulate the pathophysiology of the condition, but also the treatment options that are available.

References

Ay F., Tektas E., Mak A., and Aktay N., (2018). Postpartum depression and the factors affecting it: 2000-2017 study results. Instabul University, Turkey. DOI: 10.14744/phd.2018.31549 J Psychiatric Nurs 2018;9(3):147-152.

Beck J., (2018). What Managers Should Know About Postpartum Depression? Harvard Business Review.

Chinwe O., Afolabi A., and Mike I., (2017). Postpartum Depression: The Role of Self-Esteem, Social Support and Age. Ife PsychologIA 25(2) 2017. 105 – 115. Ife Centre for Psychologial Studies/Services, Ile-Ife, Nigeria.

Dubber, S., Reck, C., Müller, M., & Gawlik, S. (2015). Postpartum bonding: the role of perinatal depression, anxiety and maternal–fetal bonding during pregnancy. Archives of women’s mental health, 18(2), 187-195.

Gentile, S. (2017). Untreated depression during pregnancy: short-and long-term effects in offspring. A systematic review. Neuroscience, 342, 154-166.

Poyatos‐León, R., García‐Hermoso, A., Sanabria‐Martínez, G., Álvarez‐Bueno, C., Cavero‐Redondo, I., & Martínez‐Vizcaíno, V. (2017). Effects of exercise‐based interventions on postpartum depression: A meta‐analysis of randomized controlled trials. Birth, 44(3), 200-208.

Ruybal A., and Siegel J., (2017). Increasing Social Support for Women with Postpartum Depression: An Application of Attribution Theory. American Psychological Association. Stigma and Health © 2016 American Psychological Association 2017, Vol. 2, No. 2, 137–156.

Serene S., McCord M., Stein R., Kerker B., Weiss D., Hoagwood K., and Horwitz S., (2017). Beyond Screening: A Step Care Pathway for Managing Postpartum Depression in Pediatric Settings. JOURNAL OF WOMEN’S HEALTH Volume 26, Number 9, 2017. Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. DOI: 10.1089/jwh.2016.6089.

Silverman, M. E., Reichenberg, A., Savitz, D. A., Cnattingius, S., Lichtenstein, P., Hultman, C. M., … & Sandin, S. (2017). The risk factors for postpartum depression: A population‐based study. Depression and anxiety, 34(2), 178-187.

Stewart, D. E., & Vigod, S. N. (2019). Postpartum Depression: Pathophysiology, Treatment, and Emerging Therapeutics. Annual review of medicine, 70, 183-196.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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