MOD006960 Communication Skills 1 – 012 - Essay Prowess

MOD006960 Communication Skills 1 – 012

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CS1 AAT – ASSIGNMENT INSTRUCTIONS

Assessment:Coursework – Report writing
Assessment element and code:Communication Skills 1 – 012(1
Academic year:2021/2022
Trimester:2/3
Module title:Skills for Higher Education
Module code:MOD006960_012
Level:3
Module leader:Jay Joseph
Word limit:1,500 words   This excludes bibliography and other items listed in rule 6.75 of the Academic Regulations: http://web.anglia.ac.uk/anet/academic/public/academic_regs.pdf
Assessed learning outcomes:1 – 4
Submission deadline:05/08/2022

WRITING YOUR ASSIGNMENT:

  • This assignment must be completed individually.
  • You must use the Harvard referencing system.
  • Your work must indicate the number of words you have used.  Written assignments must not exceed the specified maximum number of words.  When a written assignment is marked, the excessive use of words beyond the word limit is reflected in the academic judgement of the piece of work which results in a lower mark being awarded for the piece of work (regulation 6.74).
  • Assignment submissions are to be made anonymously. Do not write your name anywhere on your work.
  • Write your student ID number at the top of every page.
  • Where the assignment comprises more than one task, all tasks must be submitted in a single document.
  • You must number all pages.

SUBMITTING YOUR ASSIGNMENT:

In order to achieve full marks, you must submit your work before the deadline.

Mitigation: The deadline for submission of mitigation in relation to this assignment is no later than five working days after the submission date of this work. Please contact [email protected] See rules 6.112 – 6.141:

http://web.anglia.ac.uk/anet/academic/public/academic_regs.pdf

ASSIGNMENT QUESTION

Write a 1500-word report that identifies and discusses report-writing strengths and weaknesses in an example report.

Your report should also identify recommendations that the author of the example report could use to improve their performance in this area in future.

This report must be based on the report-writing theory from the course. You must examine at least three report-writing factors from the example report.

The example report is included below (after the report template).

ANSWER OUTLINE

You MUST use the report format introduced in class to structure your work, and should also observe the recommended paragraphing structures.

Some advice on formatting is set out below; however, you should also engage with the guidance and example resources listed on the VLE.

All main body paragraphs should include evidence from the given reading list and the example report. This evidence should be appropriately formatted in terms of citations and references, observing the Harvard Anglia style.

ASSESSMENT CRITERIA

Your marks for this assessment will be awarded based on the following criteria:

  • Identification and explanation of report-writing factors introduced in class (40 marks)
  • Identification and interpretation of evidence from the given reading list (40 marks)
  • Academic skills (observation of report and paragraph formatting recommendations / clarity, tone and formality of writing) (20 marks)

REPORT TEMPLATE

Element:Word count:Content:Associated session
Title pageN/ATitleSID numberModule nameModule codeWord countWeek 9
Executive summaryN/AThe purpose of the workMethods used for researchMain conclusions reachedRecommendationsWeek 5
Contents pageN/AList of all the elements included within the report complete with page numbersWeek 9
Introductory paragraph150Introductory sentenceBackground sentencesThesis statementWeek 4
Findings section (the main body)950Main body paragraphs (approx. 3-4): Topic sentenceEvidence + example sentencesInterpretation + explanation sentencesLinking sentenceWeek 6
Concluding paragraph150Introductory sentenceThesis statementBackground sentencesSuggestions for future studyWeek 4
Recommendations2503+ recommendations improving report-writing performance in futureWeek 5
Reference listN/AList of all evidence from the reading list used in the findings section (formatted in the Harvard Anglia style)Week 9
AppendicesN/AFull versions of all examples referred to in the findings sectionWeek 5

Example Report

Discussion regarding whether private education should be abolished

Text Box: Student ID number: 123456 Module name: Societal Studies Module code: MOD5432_090 Word count: 1,500

Table of contents

Executive summary………………………………………………………………………………………………… 7

Introduction…………………………………………………………………. Error! Bookmark not defined.

Findings…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 9

Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 11

Recommendations………………………………………………………. Error! Bookmark not defined.

References…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 13

Executive summary

The purpoise of this report is to talk about whether private education should be abolished. It aims to respond to wider conversations around the causes of growing wealth inequality by analysing the arguments for and against abolishing private schools. The report recommends: further research is conducted to find out specifically what the public think about the prospect of abolishing private schools; a pilot scheme be trialled among bad private schools, taking these into state ownership and studying the associated costs; private schools are allowed to continue operating in the same way for the time being, but that they’re charitable tax status be removed; alternative solutions be considered in order to ensure state students receive a similar level of service to those attending private schools; and, alternative solutions be considered in order to reduce wealth inequality. In order to adopt a meaningful and comprehensively considered perspective on this matter of the utmost importance, a range of the best source information from experienced professionals with a relevant perspective on private schools and the educational sector has been used. I find that their are various arguments ‘for’ and ‘against’ abolishing private schools, and several alternatives to abolishment that may help to achieve the same aims as taking this step.

This report will discus whether fee-paying schools should be abolished! In order to get this done, it will consider the disgraceful lack of working-class representation in top jobs; use of charitable tax status among private schools; unequal educational outcomes, the immediate costs of abolishing private education; and, the reemoval of choice for parents. Private education continues to play a significant role within our society; however, increasing wealth inequality means now is the time for this educational model to be put under the microscope again. I want to help set out arguments for and against abolishing private education, helping to inform the national debate surrounding this topic, which could result in additional wait being thrown behind changes to the educational sector.

Findings

The primary argument in favour of abolishing private schools is that the current system results in a lack of representation of working-class individuals in society’s key positions. According to Weale (2021): “71% of top military officers, 74% of top judges and 61% of the country’s top doctors were educated privately” (so, 29% of military officers, 26% of judges and a small amount less than 30% of doctors weren’t privately educated). This means that privatly educated people are disproportionately represented in several of the country’s top jobs, which is not good. This correlation could reduce aspiration among those educated at comprehensive schools, as they see few role models similar to themselves. Conversely, a proportionate rate of working-class representation – achieved via the immediate, comprehensive and uniform abolishment of private schools – could inspire increased innovation and productivity among a significant portion of the working population. Therefore, I think that private schools should be abolished in order to increase working-class representation across the most senior roles within our society today.

The final reason why Janet Jones, the government’s top education minister, should abolish private education is that this system always generates unequal academic outcomes, with private school students having access to additional funding and more experienced teaching staff.

UCL (2019) says “Pupils in private schools do significantly better at A levels compared to those in similar state schools …… The large difference in resources between private and state schools is cited as the most likely mechanism driving this academic gap”. Therefore the shameful availability of additional rezources allows all private school students to achieve more representative and desirable results than those attending state schools. There’re several examples of how private schools might be better in this regard than state schools, including in relation to access to specialist equipment (e.g. good IT equipment / lab equipment), and smaller class sizes. All of these elements are guaranteed to create a more rounded educational experience, which will see private school students achieve better grades than state school students on average. As such, teaching centres that require regular payment should be abolished as they generate unequal academic outcomes.

In my opinion, another key reason for abolishing paid-for schooling is that profitable private schools are given charitable tax status, whereas other profitable businesses are not. This categorisation provides private schools with an unfair advantage other types of business are not able to access. Also this prevents additional money being collected by the government in the form of tax, which I think would be better off spent on valuable public services, such as state education, hospitals or infrastructure. According to Bennett, charitable status enables England’s 2,250 private schools to “enjoy at least 80 per cent relief on business rates, with some paying none at all” in an arrangement “saves (Eton) more than £500,000 a year and Dulwich College £600,000”, despite the former generating £62m in income and a surplus of £3.2m in 2014. These figors suggest that private schools are in fact profitable organisations, and should therefore be liable to pay

business rates in line with almost all other profitable organisations in the country. So, it is clear that private schools’ bad usage of charitable status and the impact on tax revenue is one reason why private education should be abolished. Another reason for abolishing private schools is that the children of the privately educated, often born with a silver spoon in their mouths, are more likely to be able to attend private schools, causing wealth inequality to continue across generations.

Barton (2019) thinks that, if private schools were to be abolished, the state would have to take on these students, including the associated administration and costs, which could add a mountain of cost to the government’s educational bill. In other words, while abolishing private schools might offer some long-term budgetary savings these are unlikely to happen immediately. One important reason why private education should not be abolished is that the government would have to cover the costs of edukating students currently attending private schools. With state schools widely recognised as under-funded at present, the financial responsibility of taking on new students would make it impossible for these schools to budget effectively and provide the best possible education to their students.

Alternatively, the government might have to pay to convert some existing private schools into state schools, which is also likely to cost significant amount. So, independent schools should not be binned as the government would have to pay for the journey from one system to another, including educating students currently attending private schools.

The second reason private education should not be got rid of is that the system allows parents choice over which schools their children will attend. According to (Exley, 2022): “Almost seven in ten (67%) agree parents should have a basic right to choose there children’s schools. Parents recognise and support the fantastic right to choose schools even if their own children aren’t likely to be able to attend private schools. I believe this reflects wider attitudes in Western societies, where the ability to pay for a service and choose between providers are highly valued. To remove private schools as an option would make education an exception in terms of how we typically buy and chose services. With this in mind, private education should not be abolished as everyone believes parents should have the right to make choices about the education of their children!

  • ·         Its recommended that further research is conducted to find out specifically what the public think about the prospect of ditching private schools, much of the rubbish current research focusses on related questions that only partly answer this point.
  • It is recommanded that a pilot scheme be trialled among poorly performing private schools, taking these into state ownership and studying the associated costs in order to more accurately work out how much it might cost to abolish private schools in reality.
  • It’s recommended that private schools are given permission to continue operating in the same way for the time being but that their charitable tax status be removed. This would help to alleviate one of the major criticisms of the model in the comprehension of onlooking observers, and demonstrate whether or not they are viable businesses in their own right.
  • I think that alternative solutions should be considered in order to ensure state students receive a similar level of service to those attending private schools. For example, the state budget for each pupil could be increased to match the amount private schools typically spend on each student.
  • Positive action would be one way to reduce wealth inequality, as would quotas for representation on the executive boards of top UK companies. It’s recommended that alternative solutions be considered in order to reduce wealth inequality, which private schools might play a role in establishing.

Conclusion

In order to cover both the ‘for’ and ‘against’ perspectives, the report has deliberated over: the lack of working-class representation in top jobs; use of charitable tax status among private schools, unequal educational outcomes; the immediate costs of abolishing private education, which could run into the billions if certain estimates are to be believed, which would not be good; and, the removal of choice for parents. Private education is likely to play a major role within our society for some time yet; however, with wealth inequality rising, it is timely to ask again about the role private scools play within society, and whether it is beneficial for this arrangement to continue. Further research could look into alternative solutions, such as ensuring state students have the same value of education as the privately educated. This report has discussed whether private education should be abolished.

References

Barton, G., 2019. Why abolishing private schools is ethically dubious. [Online]

Available at: https://www.tes.com/magazine/archive/why-abolishing-private-schools-ethically-dubious [Accessed 20 February 2022].

Bennett, S., 2020. Private schools’ £100m rates relief at risk. [Online]

Available at: https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/private-schools-100m-rates-relief-at-risk-6z5mnplw2 [Accessed 20 February 2022].

Exley, S., n.d. Parental freedom to choose and educational equality. [Online] Available at: https://www.bsa.natcen.ac.uk/media/38964/bsa28_4school_choice.pdf [Accessed 20 February 2022].

Lough, C., 2021. A levels 2021: A*s rise by 3x more at private schools. [Online]

Available at: https://www.tes.com/magazine/news/secondary/levels-2021-rise-3x-more-private-schools [Accessed 20 February 2022].

Weale, S., 2016. Privately educated elite continues to take top jobs, finds survey. [Online]

Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/education/2016/feb/24/privately-educated-elite-continues-to-take-top-jobs-finds-survey [Accessed 20 February 2022].

End of Example Report

Report writing – Marking criteria

%IDENTIFICATION AND EXPLANATION OF FACTORS RELEVANT TO THE TASK (40 MARKS)IDENTIFICATION AND INTERPRETATION OF EVIDENCE FROM THE GIVEN READING LIST / EXAMPLES FROM EXAMPLE REPORT (40 MARKS)ACADEMIC SKILLS (20 MARKS)
    
  >80 Outstanding / ExceptionalOutstanding / exceptional identification of report-writing factors discussed in classOutstanding / exceptional explanation of report-writing factors discussed in classOutstanding / exceptional solutions proposed to report-writing issues identifiedOutstanding / exceptional use of evidence from the given reading list throughout main body paragraphsOutstanding / exceptional use of examples from the example report throughout main body paragraphsOutstanding / exceptional interpretation of evidence and / or example from the given sources throughout main body paragraphsOutstanding / exceptional use of formal, academic language and toneOutstanding / exceptional use of report, paragraph and sentence structures introduced in classOutstanding / exceptional use of citations / referencing
  70-79 ExcellentExcellent identification of report-writing factors discussed in classExcellent explanation of report-writing factors discussed in classExcellent solutions proposed to report-writing issues identifiedExcellent use of evidence from the given reading list throughout main body paragraphsExcellent use of examples from the example report throughout main body paragraphsExcellent interpretation of evidence and / or example from the given sources throughout main body paragraphsExcellent use of formal, academic language and toneExcellent use of report, paragraph and sentence structures introduced in classExcellent use of citations / referencing
  60-69 GoodGood identification of report-writing factors discussed in classGood explanation of report-writing factors discussed in classGood solutions proposed to report-writing issues identifiedGood use of evidence from the given reading list throughout main body paragraphsGood use of examples from the example report throughout main body paragraphsGood interpretation of evidence and / or example from the given sources throughout main body paragraphsGood use of formal, academic language and toneGood use of report, paragraph and sentence structures introduced in classGood use of citations / referencing
  50-59 SatisfactorySatisfactory identification of report-writing factors discussed in classSatisfactory explanation of report-writing factors discussed in classSatisfactory solutions proposed to report-writing issues identifiedSatisfactory use of evidence from the given reading list throughout main body paragraphsSatisfactory use of examples from the example report throughout main body paragraphsSatisfactory interpretation of evidence and / or example from the given sources throughout main body paragraphsSatisfactory use of formal, academic language and toneSatisfactory use of report, paragraph and sentence structures introduced in classSatisfactory use of citations / referencing
  40-49 BasicBasic identification of report-writing factors discussed in classBasic explanation of report-writing factors discussed in classBasic solutions proposed to report-writing issues identifiedBasic use of evidence from the given reading list throughout main body paragraphsBasic use of examples from the example report throughout main body paragraphsBasic interpretation of evidence and / or example from the given sources throughout main body paragraphsBasic use of formal, academic language and toneBasic use of report, paragraph and sentence structures introduced in classBasic use of citations / referencing
  30-39Limited identification of report-writing factors discussed in classLimited use of evidence from the given reading list throughout main body paragraphsLimited use of formal, academic language and tone
LimitedLimited explanation of report-writing factors discussed in classLimited solutions proposed to report-writing issues identifiedLimited use of examples from the example report throughout main body paragraphsLimited interpretation of evidence and / or example from the given sources throughout main body paragraphsLimited use of report, paragraph and sentence structures introduced in classLimited use of citations / referencing
<30 InadequateInadequate identification of report-writing factors discussed in classInadequate explanation of report-writing factors discussed in classInadequate solutions proposed to report-writing issues identifiedInadequate use of evidence from the given reading list throughout main body paragraphsInadequate use of examples from the example report throughout main body paragraphsInadequate interpretation of evidence and / or example from the given sources throughout main body paragraphsInadequate use of formal, academic language and toneInadequate use of report, paragraph and sentence structures introduced in classInadequate use of citations / referencing

ANGLIA RUSKIN UNIVERSITY GENERIC ASSESSMENT CRITERIA AND MARKING STANDARDS

LEVEL 3 (was level 0)

Level 3 (Access) prepares students to function effectively at Level 4. Criteria for assessment at Level 3 reflect the preparatory nature of these modules. Students are expected to demonstrate the acquisition of generic learning skills appropriate for self- managed learning in an HE context. Students are expected to demonstrate that they have acquired the underpinning discipline- specific skills, knowledge and understanding necessary to undertake a programme of higher education
    Mark Bands    OutcomeGeneric Learning Outcomes (GLOs) (Academic Regulations, Section 2)
Knowledge & UnderstandingIntellectual (thinking), Practical, Affective and Transferable Skills
  Characteristics of Student Achievement by Marking Band  90-100%                      Achieves module outcome(s) related to GLO at this level    Exceptional information base and understanding of ethical issuesExceptional management of learning resources. Exceptional leadership and contributions to teams. Structured and accurate expression. Demonstrates intellectual originality and imagination. Exceptional practical/professional skills
  80-89%    Outstanding information base and understanding of ethical issuesOutstanding management of learning resources. Provides an exemplar of leadership and contributions to teams. Structured and accurate expression. Demonstrates intellectual originality and imagination. Outstanding practical/professional skills
  70-79%    Excellent information base and understanding of ethical issues  Excellent management of learning resources. Contributes well to teams. Structured and largely accurate expression. excellent academic/ intellectual skills and practical/ professional skills
  60-69%  Good information base covering all major/ ethical issuesGood management of learning resources. Expression is structured and mainly accurate. Good academic/ intellectual skills. and team/practical/professional skills
  50-59%  Satisfactory information base covering most major issues and their ethical dimensionSatisfactory use of learning resources. Expression shows some lack of structure and/or accuracy. Acceptable but undistinguished skill sets. Satisfactory team/practical/ professional skills
  40-49%  A marginal pass in module outcome(s) related to GLO at this level  Basic information base; basic understanding of major/ ethical issues of discipline  Basic use of learning resources, with significant lack of structure and/or accuracy in expression. Some issues with academic/intellectual skills. Basic team/practical/ professional skills
    30-39%  A marginal fail in module outcome(s) related to GLO at this level. Possible compensation. Sat- isfies qualifying mark    Limited information base; limited understanding of discipline and its ethical dimension    Limited use of learning resources with little contribution to team work. Weak academic/intellectual skills and difficulty with expression. Insecure practical/professional skills
  20-29%            Fails to achieve module outcome(s) related to this GLO. Qualifying mark not satisfied.  No compensation available  Little evidence of an information base; little evidence of understanding of discipline and its ethical dimensionLittle evidence of use of learning resources with little evidence of contribution to team work. Very weak academic/intellectual skills and difficulty with expression. Little evidence of practical/professional skills
  10-19%  Inadequate information base; inadequate understanding of discipline and its ethical dimension.  Inadequate use of learning resources with Inadequate contribution to team work. Very weak academic/ intellectual skills and difficulty with expression. Inadequate practical/ professional skills
  1-9%    No evidence of any information base; no understanding of discipline and its ethical dimension.  No evidence of use of learning resources with no evidence of contribution to team work. No evidence academic/ intellectual skills and incoherent expression. No evidence of practical/ professional skills
0%  Awarded for: (i) non-submission; (ii) dangerous practice and; (iii) in situations where the student fails to address the assignment brief (e.g.: answers the wrong question) and/ or related learning outcomes

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