Hokkaido Ainu and Cherokee Myths - Essay Prowess

Hokkaido Ainu and Cherokee Myths

Hokkaido Ainu and Cherokee Myths

Summaries of cultures
The Cherokee
The Cherokee people are the Native American inhabitants of the northern American particularly, in the Appalachians. More importantly, their mythology is characterized by complicated arrays of spiritual beliefs (Norton 2014, p.71). They also comprise a set of beliefs about the association between nature and human beings (totemic), spirits, and creation myths on the way the universe began. Moreover, their faith implies that powers, dreams, visions, and signs were all donations of the spirits (Mooney 2012, p. 40). The Cherokee people’s belief suggests that the actual world is interweaved with and controlled by the spirits. Furthermore, they also have the creation myth, which describes how the world was created. Precisely, the creation myth explains the earth as a huge floating island enclosed by an ocean. It also hangs from the universe by cords linked to the four main points (the North, South, East, and West). The narrative describes that the first earth was developed when a small water beetle referred to as Dayuni’si, descended from Galun’lati (the sky world) to observe what was under the water. He rowed over the water surface but did not get an area to rest. Subsequently, he submerged to the bottom of the ocean and came up with soft mud. Finally, the mud stretched out in all directions and developed to be the other (Norton 2014, p.77).
The Hokkaido Ainu
The Hokkaido Ainu are native inhabitants of Japan. They highly revered things essential to them or above their power. In this regard, they believed in kamuy or gods. Additionally, they practiced various rites for their gods (Leeming 2010, p.33). Some of these gods comprised of ‘nature’ gods including thunder, wind, water, and fire while animal gods consisted of spotted owls, foxes, and bears. The ‘plant’ goods were mugwort, mushroom, and an aconite while ‘object’ gods involved items such as pots, boats, and supernatural beings, which safeguarded their houses. The term Ainu refers to human beings, which is contrary to the gods (Kimura 2017, p.309).
Comparison and Analysis
Both Cherokee and Ainu creation myths are similar because they describe the existence of a supernatural being who directs an animal to move to the oceans in search of bits of mud or sand with which to construct a habitable land (Leeming 2010, p.36). For instance, the Ainu version states that the creator divinity or god instructs a water wagtail to construct comfortable land in the watery earth below. The small bird flickered over the waters, flapping water aside and later he filled areas of the earth by stamping them using his feet. Consequently, islands and earth were formed

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