High Molecular Weight Fluorescein Corneal Epithelial Defects Management Essay - Essay Prowess

High Molecular Weight Fluorescein Corneal Epithelial Defects Management Essay

High Molecular Weight Fluorescein Corneal Epithelial Defects Management Essay

Managing corneal epithelial defects using high molecular weight fluorescein to prevent contact lens staining and removal of bandage contact lenses

Introduction

The cornea occupies about two-thirds of the refractive ability of the eye. It is an arrangement consisting mainly water and collagen that is safeguarded and maintained on its posterior and anterior surfaces by endothelium and epithelium, respectively. Corneal epithelial defects are the damage of the outermost layer of cornea (Cheng et al 9). Corneal epithelial defects are the most prevalent problems recorded in optical pathologies and in the entire population. Corneal epithelial defects were responsible for more than 10 per cent of all eye-associated visits in the emergency rooms in the past few decades (Katzman and Bennie 5). Research indicates that the problem is often overlooked but it may lead to loss of vision. Significantly, the symptoms of these defects include sensation of foreign body, tearing and pain in the affected eye that are often alleviated by the implantation of relevant anaesthetic. However, the only exclusion is neurotropic keratopathy (Braus et al 2). Such symptoms can be appearing along with pain during movement of the eye or blinking and photophobia. The corneal epithelial defects require physical examination in order to determine the level of the damage. In this respect, a comprehensive history in needed to assess the causes of the corneal defect. In addition, an in-depth test of both eyes is required in most instances of trauma and systemic diseases both eyes can be defective.

The loss can be due to a wide range of issues including neurotropic cornea, corneal dryness

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