Challenges of Business Processes Management in Healthcare by Helfert Article Summary - Essay Prowess

Challenges of Business Processes Management in Healthcare by Helfert Article Summary

Challenges of Business Processes Management in Healthcare by Helfert Article Summary

Summary of the Article
Planning is a crucial process that determines the success or failure of a project, business, organisation or nation. The article “Challenges of Business Processes Management in Healthcare” by Helfert describes the importance of planning in healthcare sector that is crucial for management of information, time and staff retention (Helfert, 2). The article used standardized healthcare HR and payroll system in healthcare sector known as Personnel Payroll Attendance and Recruitment System (PPARS) in Ireland as a case study to explain the importance of proper management. Due to high financial requirement and duration the project implementation was not successful in achieving its goals.
Planning function of management
As the commons saying suggests “Failing to plan is planning to fail,” planning is an essential step in management with the aim of determining the course of actions (Schermerhorn, 78). Therefore for a successful project implementation, planning must consider all aspects of the project. Planning function of management involves doing things in an orderly way and thinking before actions are implemented. Planning function involves steps such as establishing objectives, and establishing planning premises. The objective of the PPRS project in health care was to ensure better management of Human resource (Helfert, 4). However, the project did not set goal that are achievable since the cost and challenges of implementation were not taken into considerations.
Planning aspects of this scenario
Planning aspects involve taking into account the four domain of management. Firstly, the plan must accomplish the purpose and objectives of the intended project (Schermerhorn, 40). For instance, the PPARS system did not meet the intended function of the healthcare because the project was poorly managed (Helfert, 5). Secondly, planning comes prior to all other managerial tasks such as staffing, motivation, budgeting and organising. The PPARS was not successful due to a huge amount of budget involved in the implementation indicating that there was poor planning on budget (Helfert, 5). Thirdly, planning should involve all managers in the senior and junior levels. As in the case of PPARS in Ireland, the management of healthcare were not involved in planning as many were not trained on the process. Lastly, the plan must focus on efficiency of the project (Schermerhorn, 89). The PPRAS project was not efficient in its aim to minimise cost although it was designed to minimise spending on HR department.
Identify what was done correctly and where changes could have been made.
The PPARS system was planned to reduce the cost of human resource (HR) expenditure and establishing effective payroll system. This was correctly done because the objective of the plan was to reduce the high cost of spending in health care (Helfert, 7). In addition, it was aimed at addressing deficits problems within the HR management such as benchmarking, reducing response time and workforce planning as well as management of information (Schermerhorn, 56). The plan provided for an integrated system of HR management which incorporated payroll, time management and attendance. However, changes could have been made in setting achievable goals using the system (Helfert, 8). This is because the PPSAR system did not have crucial features that could handle the payment of allowances to the nurses during overtime. Moreover, training of staffs could be part of the plan before implementation.
Outcome of the implementation
During the implementation of the PPARS system there were high levels of diversity and variance in payroll standards, processes and regulations. Most healthcare staffs used the system to specify their own payment allowances and rules (Helfert, 13). This led to the problem of budget overspending. This was partly contributed by the fact that there were no plans to train healthcare workers on the new system. In addition, planning did not account for poor governance and time pressure which contributed to implementation failure of the system. Besides, the project lacked plans on functional description and stable requirement.

Works cited
Schermerhorn, John R. Management. 1st ed. New York: J. Wiley, 2005. Print.
Helfert, Markus. “Challenges of business processes management in healthcare: Experience in the Irish healthcare sector.” Business Process Management Journal 15.6 (2009): 937-952.