Darwin’s theory of natural selection: peppered moths - Essay Prowess

Darwin’s theory of natural selection: peppered moths

Darwin’s theory of natural selection: peppered moths

Many predators look for the prey using their eyes. Therefore, the prey species have a unique body colouration which camouflages with the environment. Camouflaging makes it difficult for the predators to spot the animals. The prey is safe from the predators whenever the latter fails to spot them as it means the predator will not eat them. For example, a chameleon keeps on changing its colour to that of the environment thus hiding from predators like eagles. Also, the frogs and lizards are present on surfaces that have a similar colour to that of their bodies (Davis np). Secondly, some animals are brightly coloured but produce a toxic chemical which makes it poisonous for the predator consumption. The bright colour makes it easy for the predator to spot the prey and know it is poisonous. In some instances when the predator consumes the prey, the poison causes the predator to spit out the prey instead of swallowing. The colouration is present in insects, mites, and frogs (Davis np).

Relate environmental changes to change

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