Conflict of Hate and Love in “Daddy” by Sylvia Plath - Essay Prowess

Conflict of Hate and Love in “Daddy” by Sylvia Plath

Conflict of Hate and Love in “Daddy” by Sylvia Plath

Conflict of Hate and Love in “Daddy” by Sylvia Plath

In the poem ‘Daddy’ Sylvia Plath is a young child who lost her father at an early age. As a young child, she used this poem to express the intense emotions she felt during her father’s life and death. Plath both fiercely hates and passionately loves her father. She establishes love with her father after seeing him as God during her childhood (Bloom, 7). In addition, she develops dire need to be part of love and to be loved. Contrary, the hate establishes from a powerful, inherent fear she felt towards him (Brain, 3). Seeing her unanswered feelings for her father as the core of all her suffering and pain, she is trying to free herself from the influence of her father (Bloom, 8). She also compared these times with the horrible relationship she shared with her husband.

As Sylvia Plath grew older with a broader sense of understanding, she realizes that the qualities her father possessed was nothing better than that of Nazi, Adolf Hitler and a vampire. Sylvia Plath the narrator of the poem, ‘Daddy’ lived with her possessive father. She was in a relationship with her father, where she felt captive, could not open her mouth to say a word. Like her tongue was struck in her jaw. She felt like a dictator, who she considered to be like Nazi of Germany, a vampire and Adolf Hitler, governed her. Now, Plath is on a journey in search of a sense of belongingness, love and security. She falls in love with her husband, only to discover, that he is a replica of her father.

Plath lived a harsh life, a life that she presently considers inhumane. That life was driven by violence and destruction. Two men victimized her, whom she thought would shield her from the world’s corruption, unfortunately not. As Sylvia evolves into an adult, she realizes that her childhood days were gone and would never regain. The joy, fun and amusement were never p

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