1974 War in Cyprus from the Perspective of Walzers Jus Ad Bellum Essay - Essay Prowess

1974 War in Cyprus from the Perspective of Walzers Jus Ad Bellum Essay

1974 War in Cyprus from the Perspective of Walzers Jus Ad Bellum Essay

1974 War in Cyprus from the Perspective of Walzers Jus Ad Bellum (Justice of War)

Introduction

Wars are fought for diverse reasons. However, those who project conflict against others often justification for the wanton destruction on economic, social, cultural, and political loss that accompanies it. Walzer (2015) provides that modern warfare is about seeking justice relative to a particular moralist dimension. This essay discusses the 1974 war in Cypress from the perspective on Walzers Jus Ad Bellum.

The 1974 War in Cypress

Strategically positioned on the Mediterranean Sea’s eastern beaches, Cypress remains a political and economic enclave that opens up the region for commerce or other attributes important towards control of the region. For this reason, Cypress has in its long past experienced regime changes to the extent that it is predominantly both Greek and Turkish. Prior to 1571, the Island was considered largely a Greek colony. However, the Venetians who had political control over the island could not hold it against the Ottoman Empire. In 1914, the authority over the Island once again changed hands and was taken up as an outpost of the British Empire.

The people of Cypress coexisted peacefully regardless of ethnic differences. The fact that the Greek, as the longstanding inhabitants of the lands outnumbered the Turks 80:18. As British Colonial rule came to a close, ethnic tensions amongst the one’s brotherly neighbors turned bloody as each developed national identities relative to their presence in Cypress. The Turks favored partitioning of Cypress while the Greek demanded that the Island be unified with Greece. In 1955, the Greek Cypriots formed the National Organization of Cypriot Fighters (EOKA) to wrestled independence from the British. In 1958, Turkish Cypriots founded the Turkish Resistance Organization (TMT). The outcome was one where the British used the TMT to counter uprisings by the EOKA up until 1960 when Cyprus gained international recognition as a republic.

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